Why haven't you tried the menstrual cup yet?

Why haven't you tried the menstrual cup yet?

 Why haven't you tried the menstrual cup yet?

 

If you haven't tried the menstrual cup yet, um, why not?

With unfair vagina-taxes on basic women’s personal hygiene products, an increasingly exhausted planet, and a greater range of design options, there are now more reasons than ever to give the menstrual cup a fair go. 

I know it might seem daunting, but I promise they are nowhere near as scary as you think.

When I first heard about the menstrual cup I thought it was sort of like a plastic tumbler that hippies in communes advocated, and there was absolutely no way I was putting something like that up there! Luckily they are really nowhere near as scary as I had imagined. Basically it's a soft flexible cup usually made from silicon. And being flexible, you can fold it to about the size of a tampon.

But can't it leak?

Of course this is a possibility, but if inserted correctly the cup will seal by suction, saving you from any awkward accidents.

Can it get stuck?

Remember in Year 5 when this was the only question we cared about when it came to tampons? Luckily, with menstrual cups the answer is basically the same- No. If you think it's stuck, do not panic- just like tampons, it cannot go past your cervix. Squeeze the sides of the cup to break the seal and voila!, you're good to go. 

So, no more excuses!

5 Reasons to give the cup a go

1. Be a planet-saving heroine

"That's almost 10,000 disposable menstrual products ending up in landfill by the time you've hit menopause"

The average woman uses 20 pads/tampons each month. Add it up over a lifetime, and that's almost 10,000 disposable menstrual products ending up in landfill by the time you've hit menopause. Not to mention the environmental effects of extremely water-intensive cotton production and excess packaging. Add that to the already painful perks that come with being a woman, that sure is a lot of environmental responsibility for a uterus.

2. Cost

The price. Forget about boxes and packets each month. Being reusable, the menstrual cup is a one time purchase, usually somewhere between the $15 and $50 (AUD) mark.  

3. No wings, no strings  

I have to say the best thing about menstrual cup, (apart from its money and planet saving perks) is its invisibility. It's so discreet that no one can tell you're on your period, even when you're naked. This means you can essentially pretend that periods don't exist for the rest of your life;  go swimming, get frisky or get that brazilian you booked at the wrong time of the month.

4. Comfort and cleanliness

Every time I see those easy, breezy, care-free advertisements for pads (now with wings!) I scream "LIES!" As someone who absolutely despises pads (seriously - why would I, a grown woman, want to wear an overpriced, bloody diaper!?), the menstrual cup really is the best thing since sliced bread.

It is so much cleaner and comfortable than a pad. This thing is everything you love about the tampon and more.

5. Time and peace of mind

Wait so how is it better than a tampon then? Time is essence here. You can keep the cup in for up to 12 hours. Finally a product you can comfortably use overnight and not worry about the risk of TSS (Toxic Shock Syndrome). A lot of people ask me about using it in public bathrooms, but unlike a tampon, you don't need to change it every 3-4 hours, so usually you can just change it once before bed and then when you get up in the morning. 

I give the Lily Cup Compact by Intimina 5 stars for being most convenient menstrual cup around - it even fits in my wallet. 

 

No, really I could go on. But there are literally hundreds of amazing women on YouTube sharing their experiences and advice to calm all your fears about menstrual cups. So apart from their initial terrifying nature, there are really only upsides. Why not try it next month

 
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