Who made your clothes?

Who made your clothes?

This week is Fashion Revolution week (24th - 30th April 2017). The Fashion Revolution movement calls for greater transparency in the fashion industry, including the sustainability and ethics of fashion labels.

The week especially highlights the treatment of workers in the fashion industry and commemorates 4 years since the Rana Plaza factory collapse in Bangladesh on the 24th April 2013, where 1,138 people were killed and a further 2500 injured. 

"If a brand doesn’t respond, keep asking. Our power is in persistence."

The campaign calls for individuals across social media to ask brands to provide transparency in their production. Instagrammers can post a photograph of the label of an item of clothing and use the hashtag #WhoMadeMyClothes to raise awareness and and tag the featured brand to get their attention. You can also print out a #WhoMadeMyClothes poster and share a selfie to promote the cause using the following link

  FashionRevolution.org

FashionRevolution.org

As customers, brands value our voices. Especially the persistent. Some brands may reply with a stock-standard social responsibility statement, tell you where but not who made your clothes. Some may not reply at all. If you're lucky, and persistent a brand may show and tell you about who made your clothes. The Fashion Revolution movement encourages individuals to stay strong and persistent, especially across social media, until a brand listens.

 FashionRevolution.org

FashionRevolution.org

Alternatively you can write directly to a fashion label. The Fashion Revolution team have even made you a quick template to print and mail or email to a brand's headquarters.   

Yesterday the Fashion Revolution team also published the 2017 Fashion Transparency Index, a compilation of rankings and statistics of the transparency in sustainability and labour welfare for the 100 biggest fashion brands. Find out how your clothes stack up here.

So, who made your clothes?

This caterpillar can eat plastic bags

This caterpillar can eat plastic bags

Are your clothes worse than microbeads?

Are your clothes worse than microbeads?